News

Docetaxel Improves Survival in Prostate Cancer

temp-post-image

The early addition of the chemotherapy agent, docetaxel, to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival compared with ADT only among patients with advanced prostate cancer. These results were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Metastatic prostate cancer refers to cancer of the prostate that has spread to distant sites in the body. Prostate cancer is often stimulated to grow from exposure to male hormones, particularly testosterone.

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a common type of therapy used in prostate cancer that reduces the formation of testosterone and thus, inhibits the growth of prostate cancer.

Researchers continue to evaluate novel treatment approaches for prostate cancer, including combination therapy.

Recently, a clinical study was conducted to compare the addition of the chemotherapy agent docetaxel to ADT to ADT only in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The study included approximately 700 patients. One group was treated with ADT plus early docetaxel and the other group was treated with ADT alone.

The median overall survival was 57.6 months among patients treated with docetaxel plus ADT, compared with only 44 months among patients treated with ADT only.
At the time of the last analysis, patients with high volumes of cancer achieved the greatest benefit from the addition of docetaxel.
The addition of docetaxel to ADT early in the treatment delivery results in significantly greater survival than ADT only.

Reference: Sweeney C, Yu-Hui C, Carducci M, et al. Chemohormonal therapy in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. New England Journal of Medicine. August 5, 2015DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1503747.